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Aesthetic Edge
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Fresno, CA 93711
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Reliable Dentures - Fresno CA

Dental Crowns, Tooth Bridges or Dentures?

What is a denture?

People wear dentures to replace lost or missing teeth so they can enjoy a healthy diet and smile with confidence. Dentures are made of either acrylic (plastic) or metal.
A ‘complete' or ‘full' denture is one which replaces all the natural teeth in either the upper or lower jaw.
A ‘partial' denture fills in the spaces left by lost or missing teeth. It may be fastened to your natural teeth with metal clasps or ‘precision attachments'.

Why should I wear dentures?

Full dentures, to replace all your own teeth, fit snugly over your gums. They will help you to eat comfortably and speak clearly, and will improve your confidence and self-esteem.
Partial dentures replace teeth that are missing and can sometimes be supported by the teeth you have left. If you have gaps between your teeth, then your other teeth may move to take up some of the space, so you could end up with crooked or tilted teeth. This could affect the way you bite and could damage your other teeth.

How soon can I have a denture after my teeth are taken out?

Usually dentures can be fitted straight after your teeth have been removed. These are called ‘immediate dentures'. You will need to visit the dentist beforehand for them to take measurements and impressions of your mouth.
With immediate dentures you don't have to be without teeth while your gums are healing. However, bone and gums can shrink over time, especially during the first six months after your teeth have been taken out. If your gums shrink, your immediate dentures may need relining, adjusting or even replacing. Your dentist will be able to talk to you about this.
Sometimes your dentist may advise you to wait until your gums are healed before having your dentures, as this can sometimes provide a better fit. Healing may take several months.

Who will make and fit my denture?

Your dentist may take measurements and impressions of your mouth, then order your dentures from a dental technician. However, if you would prefer, you can ask to visit a clinical dental technician yourself.
Clinical dental technicians are dental technicians who have taken a further qualification to allow them to provide dentures directly to you. If you have full dentures, you can visit a clinical dental technician without seeing a dentist. But you should still visit your dentist regularly, as often as they recommend, so they can check the rest of your mouth, pick up any problems and check the fit of your dentures.
A clinical dental technician can fit you with partial dentures rather than your dentist. You would need to see your dentist first, and they will give you a treatment plan and a certificate of oral health. This must be given to a clinical dental technician at a dental laboratory for them to treat you.

Will dentures make me look different?

Replacing lost or missing teeth is very good for your health and appearance. A complete or full denture replaces your natural teeth and gives support to your cheeks and lips. Without this support, sagging facial muscles can make a person look older and they will find it harder to eat and speak properly.
Dentures can be made to closely match your natural teeth so that your appearance hardly changes. Modern dentures may even improve the look of your smile and help fill out the appearance of your face.

Will I be able to eat with dentures?

Eating will take a little practice. Start with soft foods cut into small pieces. Chew slowly, using both sides of your mouth at the same time to stop the denture from moving. As you become more used to your denture, add other foods until you get back to your normal healthy diet.

Will dentures change how I speak?

Pronouncing certain words may take practice. Reading out loud and repeating difficult words will help.
If you find that your dentures occasionally slip when you laugh, cough or smile, reposition them by gently biting down and swallowing. If this continues see your dentist.

How long should I wear my dentures?

During the first few days, your dentist may advise you to wear them for most of the time, including while you are asleep. After your mouth gets used to your dentures your dentist may advise that you take them out before going to bed. This allows your gums to rest and helps keep your mouth healthy. When you remove your dentures at night, it is best to store them in a small amount of water to stop them warping.

My upper denture fits fine, so why am I having problems with my lower plate?

The upper denture usually has much more suction to hold it in place. There is much less gum support in the lower jaw, and the lower denture may feel more wobbly as it has to be balanced between your cheeks and your tongue.
After a little while you will learn the shape of your new denture and how to keep it in place, even when you open your mouth wide.

Should I use a denture fixative?

Dentures are custom made to fit your mouth and you shouldn't need a denture fixative. However, over time, dentures may become loose and not fit as well. When this happens, some people prefer to use a fixative for a short time before having them replaced. A poorly fitting denture may cause irritation and sores. This can often happen if you have worn ‘immediate' dentures for some time.

Must I do anything special to care for my mouth?

Even with full dentures, you still need to take good care of your mouth. Every morning and evening, brush your gums, tongue and the roof of your mouth with a soft brush. This removes plaque and helps the blood circulation in your mouth. If you wear partial dentures, it is even more important that you brush your teeth thoroughly every day. This will help stop tooth decay and gum disease that can lead to you losing more of your teeth. Your dentist may refer you to the hygienist to have your remaining natural teeth cleaned regularly.

How do I take care of my dentures?

Dentures may break if you drop them. Always clean your dentures over a bowl of water or a folded towel in case you drop them.

To clean your denture, the general rule is: brush, soak, brush. Brush your dentures before soaking, to help remove any bits of food. Using an effervescent (fizzy) denture cleaner will help remove stubborn stains and leave your denture feeling fresher - always follow the manufacturer's instructions. Then brush the dentures again, as you would your own teeth, being careful not to scrub too hard as this may cause grooves in the surface.

Most dentists advise using toothpaste and a small- to medium-headed toothbrush. Make sure you clean all the surfaces of the dentures, including the surface which touches your gums. This is especially important if you use any kind of denture fixative.
If you notice a buildup of stains or scale, have your denture cleaned by your dentist or hygienist.

How long will my dentures last?

As long as you treat your dentures well, they should last several years. However, your dentures will need to be relined or re-made because of normal wear or a change in the shape of your mouth. Bone and gum ridges can shrink, causing your jaws to meet differently. Loose dentures can cause health problems, including sores and infections, not to mention discomfort. A loose or badly fitting denture can also make eating and talking more difficult. It is important to replace worn or badly fitting dentures before they cause problems.

How often should I see my dentist after having dentures?

Regular dental check-ups and having your teeth professionally cleaned are vital for keeping your teeth and gums healthy. Most dentists recommend a dental check up at least once a year. Regular visits allow your dentist to check the soft parts of your mouth, including the tongue and cheeks. These examinations are important so the dentist can spot any infections, mouth conditions or even mouth cancer at the earliest stages. Full-denture wearers should check with their dentist about how often they should visit.
With regular professional care, a positive attitude and persistence, you can become one of the millions of people who wear their dentures with a smile.

Are dentures my only option?

No. Implants are another option to consider. Ask your dentist for more information.

 Full & Partial Dentures
A denture is a removable replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissues. Two types of dentures are available -- complete and partial dentures. Complete dentures are used when all the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain.
Complete Dentures
Complete dentures can be either "conventional" or "immediate." Made after the teeth have been removed and the gum tissue has begun to heal, a conventional denture is ready for placement in the mouth about eight to 12 weeks after the teeth have been removed.
Unlike conventional dentures, immediate dentures are made in advance and can be positioned as soon as the teeth are removed. As a result, the wearer does not have to be without teeth during the healing period. However, bones and gums shrink over time, especially during the healing period following tooth removal. Therefore a disadvantage of immediate dentures compared with conventional dentures is that they require more adjustments to fit properly during the healing process and generally should only be considered a temporary solution until conventional dentures can be made.
Partial Dentures
A removable partial denture or bridge usually consists of replacement teeth attached to a pink or gum-colored plastic base, which is connected by metal framework that holds the denture in place in the mouth. Partial dentures are used when one or more natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw. A fixed (permanent) bridge replaces one or more teeth by placing crowns on the teeth on either side of the space and attaching artificial teeth to them. This "bridge" is then cemented into place. Not only does a partial denture fill in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from changing position. A precision partial denture is removable and has internal attachments rather than clasps that attach to the adjacent crowns. This is a more natural-looking appliance.
Are There Alternatives to Dentures?
Yes, dental implants can be used to support permanently cemented bridges, eliminating the need for a denture. The cost is usually greater, but the implants and bridges more closely resemble the feel of real teeth. Dental implants are becoming the alternative to dentures but not everyone is a candidate for implants. Consult your dentist for advice.

Does Insurance Cover the Cost of Dentures?
Most dental insurance providers cover some or all of the cost of dentures. However, contact your company to find out the specifics of what they will cover.
How Are Dentures Made?
The denture development process takes about three to six weeks and several appointments. Once your dentist or prosthodontist (a dentist who specializes in the restoration and replacement of teeth) determines what type of appliance is best for you, the general steps are to:

  • Make a series of impressions of your jaw and take measurements of how your jaws relate to one another and how much space is between them.
  • Create models, wax forms, and/or plastic patterns in the exact shape and position of the denture to be made. You will "try in" this model several times and the denture will be assessed for color, shape, and fit before the final denture is cast.
  • Cast a final denture
  • Adjustments will be made as necessary

What Do New Dentures Feel Like?
New dentures may feel a little odd or loose for a few weeks until the muscles of the cheeks and tongue learn to keep them in place and you get comfortable inserting and removing them. Also, it is not unusual for minor irritation or soreness to occur and for saliva flow to increase when you first start wearing dentures, but these problems will diminish as the mouth adjusts.
Will Dentures Make Me Look Different?
Dentures are made to closely resemble your natural teeth so there should be no noticeable change in appearance. In fact, dentures may even improve your smile and fill out your facial appearance.
Will Eating With New Dentures Be Difficult?
Eating with new dentures will take a little practice and may be uncomfortable for some wearers for a few weeks. To get used to the new denture, start with soft foods cut into small pieces. Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth. As you get used to new dentures, add other foods until you return to a normal diet. Be cautious with hot or hard foods and sharp-edged bones or shells. And, avoid foods that are extremely sticky or hard. You may want to avoid chewing gum while you adjust to the denture. Also, don't use toothpicks while wearing dentures.
Will Dentures Change How I Speak?
After getting dentures, you may have difficulty pronouncing certain words. If so, practice by saying the difficult words out loud. With practice and with time you will become accustomed to speaking properly with dentures.
If dentures "click" while you're talking, contact your dentist. Dentures may occasionally slip when you laugh, cough, or smile. Reposition the dentures by gently biting down and swallowing. If any speaking problem persists, consult your dentist or prosthodontist.
Are Dentures Worn 24 Hours a Day?
Your dentist or prosthodontist will instruct you as to how long to wear dentures and when to remove them. During the first several days after receiving your denture, you may be asked to wear it all the time, including while you sleep. Although this may be temporarily uncomfortable, it is the quickest way to identify the areas on the denture that may need adjustment. Once adjustments are made, you should remove dentures before going to bed. This allows gum tissues to rest and allows normal stimulation and cleansing by the tongue and saliva. The denture can be put back in the mouth in the morning.

Should I Use a Denture Adhesive?
A denture adhesive may be considered under the following circumstances:

  • To enhance satisfaction with a properly constructed denture. Adhesives enhance retention, stability, bite force, and an individual's sense of security.
  • To assist individuals with dry mouth conditions that lessen denture adherence, such as individuals taking cold medications, those with neurologic disabilities including strokes, and the elderly.
  • To provide added stability and security for those who place unusual demands on facial muscles, such as public speakers or musicians.

When Shouldn't Denture Adhesives Be Considered?
There are situations when denture adhesives should not be used. Those cases include:

  • When it is used as a "fix" for ill-fitting or poorly constructed dentures. If dentures begin to feel loose, cause discomfort or cause sores to develop, contact your dentist as soon as possible.
  • When a dentist has not evaluated dentures for a long time. Dentures rest on gum tissue and the jawbone, which shrink and deteriorate, respectively, over time. Therefore, the real problem might be a need for a denture adjustment or new dentures.
  • When oral hygiene practices cannot be sustained.
  • When adhesives have been used for a long time, especially when visits to the dentist are infrequent, and when the frequency and volume of the adhesive use increases. These developments may indicate the need for a denture adjustment or new dentures.
  • When any known allergy exists to the adhesive's ingredients.

How Are Denture Adhesives Applied?
Here are some tips to consider when applying denture adhesives:

  • Use the minimum amount necessary to provide the maximum benefit. Apply less than you think you need, and then gradually increase the amount until you feel comfortable.
  • Distribute the adhesive evenly on the tissue bearing surface of the denture.
  • Apply or reapply when necessary to provide the desired effect.
  • Always apply the adhesive to a thoroughly clean denture.
  • Remember adhesives work best with a well-fitting denture.

What Are the Types of Denture Adhesives?

  • Paste application. Apply this denture adhesive to a dry or preferably wet denture. Avoid placing adhesive close to the denture borders. If the adhesive oozes, use less of the product. For dentures on the upper jaw, apply three short strips of adhesive -- or a series of small dots -- along the ridge area and one down the center. For dentures on the lower jaw, apply three short strips of adhesive -- or a series of small dots -- in the center of the ridge area.
  • Powder application. Sprinkle a thin, uniform layer throughout the tissue-bearing surface of the denture. Shake off excess powder and press the denture into place. Powders may be preferred over pastes because they are easier to clean off the denture and tissue. In addition, they don't have the same tendency as pastes do to "shim" (keep the denture away from the tissue).

Are Denture Adhesives Safe?
Dental adhesives are safe as long as they are used as directed. If the denture is well-fitting and the adhesive is only used to give added stability, there should be no ill effects. If adhesives are used excessively to fill voids for an ill-fitting denture, they can be harmful to the underlying soft and hard tissues. Occasionally, in these cases, inflammation of the soft tissues can result. In addition, because of its movement on the soft tissue and underlying bone, an ill-fitting denture can cause bone loss.
Caring for Dentures

Proper denture care is important for both the health of your dentures and mouth. Here are some tips.

  • Handle dentures with great care. To avoid accidentally dropping them, stand over a folded towel or a full sink of water when handling dentures.
  • Brush and rinse dentures daily. Like natural teeth, dentures must be brushed daily to remove food and plaque. Brushing also helps prevent the development of permanent stains on the dentures. Use a brush with soft bristles that is specifically designed for cleaning dentures. Avoid using a hard-bristled brush as it can damage or wear down dentures. Gently brush all surfaces of the denture and be careful not to damage the plastic or bend attachments. In between brushings, rinse dentures after every meal.
  • Clean with a denture cleaner. Hand soap or mild dishwashing liquid can be used for cleaning dentures. Household cleansers and many types of toothpaste may be too abrasive for dentures and should not be used. Also, avoid using bleach, as this may whiten the pink portion of the denture. Ultrasonic cleaners can be used to care for dentures. These cleaners are small bathtub-like devices that contain a cleaning solution. The denture is immersed in the tub and then sound waves create a wave motion that dislodges the undesirable deposits. Use of an ultrasonic cleaner, however, does not replace a thorough daily brushing. Products with the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Acceptance are recommended since they have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.
  • Denture care when not being worn. Dentures need to be kept moist when not being worn so they do not dry out or lose their shape. When not worn, dentures should be placed in a denture cleanser soaking solution or in water. However, if the denture has metal attachments, the attachments could tarnish if placed in a soaking solution. Your dentist can recommend the best methods for caring for your particular denture. Dentures should never be placed in hot water, as it can cause them to warp.

Can I Adjust or Repair Dentures?
One or more follow-up appointments are generally needed soon after receiving dentures for any necessary adjustments. Never attempt to adjust or repair dentures yourself. Never bend any part of the clasp or metal attachments yourself; doing so can weaken the metal structure. "Do-it-yourself" repair kits can permanently damage dentures and over-the-counter glues may contain harmful chemicals.
Dentures that don't fit properly can cause irritation and sores in the mouth and on gums. Be sure to contact your oral health care provider if a denture breaks, cracks, chips, or if one of the teeth becomes loose. Oftentimes, he or she can make the necessary adjustment or repair the same day. For some complicated repairs, your denture may have to be sent to a special dental lab.
Will My Dentures Need to Be Replaced?
Over time, dentures will need to be relined, rebased, or remade due to normal wear, natural age-related changes to the face, jaw bones, and gums, or if the dentures become loose. To reline or rebase a denture, the dentist or prosthodontist refits the denture base or makes a new denture base and reuses the existing teeth. Generally, complete dentures should be used for five to seven years before a replacement is necessary.
How Should I Care for My Mouth and Gums if I Have Dentures?
Even with full dentures, it is important to brush your gums, tongue, and palate with a soft-bristled brush every morning before putting in dentures. This removes plaque and stimulates circulation in the mouth. Pay special attention to cleaning teeth that fit under the denture's metal clasps. Plaque that becomes trapped under the clasps will increase the risk of tooth decay. If you wear a partial denture, be sure to remove it before brushing natural teeth. Clean, rest, and massage the gums regularly. Rinsing your mouth daily with lukewarm salt water will help clean the gums. Eat a balanced diet so that proper nutrition and a healthy mouth can be maintained.
How Often Should I See the Dentist if I Have Dentures?
If you have dentures, your dentist or prosthodontist will advise you about how often to visit, but every six months should be the norm. Regular dental visits are important so that dentures and the mouth can be examined for proper denture fit, to look for signs of oral diseases including cancer, and to have teeth professionally cleaned.


dental and dentures
Fresno Dentist Mankirat Gill
( Dr. Mankirat Gill D.D.S.),
Aesthetic Edge, The Dental Practice of Mankirat Gill D.D.S.
Mankirat Gill D.D.S.
3616 W Shaw Ave Fresno, CA 93711-3231
Phone: 559-271-8400 URL of Map
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